Was Goswami Tulsidas a reconciler of Advaita and Vishishtadvaita? Ramcharitmanas Tulsidas Advaita Vishishtadvaita Ramayana (in Vaishnavism)

1 points | Post submitted by jay 476 days ago | 1 comments | viewed 675 times

Was Goswami Tulsidas a reconciler of Advaita and Vishishtadvaita? 


  • jay476 days ago | +0 points

    Tulsidas was a follower of the Ramanandi Sampradaya, which is a Vaishnava sect that believes in the worship of Lord Rama as the supreme deity. The Ramanandi Sampradaya is also associated with the Vishishtadvaita school of philosophy, which teaches that the individual soul (jiva) and the supreme soul (Brahman) are not identical but are intimately related to each other. This philosophy emphasizes the concept of bhakti or devotion as the means to attain liberation.

    However, Tulsidas was also influenced by the teachings of the Advaita school of philosophy, which teaches the non-dualistic nature of reality and the identity of the individual soul with the supreme soul. In his writings, Tulsidas often uses Advaita terminology and concepts to describe the nature of the divine and the relationship between the individual soul and the supreme soul.

    Thus, while Tulsidas did not explicitly try to reconcile the differences between Advaita and Vishishtadvaita, his writings reflect elements of both schools, and he synthesized them in his own unique way to express his devotion to Lord Rama.

    The influence of both Advaita and Vishishtadvaita on Tulsidas's writings can be observed through his use of terminology and concepts associated with both schools. For instance, in the Ramcharitmanas, Tulsidas often uses the term "Brahman" to refer to the ultimate reality, which is a concept associated with Advaita. At the same time, he also emphasizes the concept of bhakti or devotion, which is central to the Vishishtadvaita school.

    Furthermore, Tulsidas's commentary on the Hanuman Chalisa, which is a hymn to Lord Hanuman that is widely revered in the Hindu tradition, reflects his synthesis of both schools. In his commentary, Tulsidas explains that the chanting of the Hanuman Chalisa is a means to realize the non-dualistic nature of reality and attain liberation, which is a concept associated with Advaita. However, he also emphasizes that the devotion to Lord Hanuman is essential in this process, which is a concept associated with Vishishtadvaita.

    Additionally, scholars of Hindu philosophy have noted the influence of both schools on Tulsidas's writings. For instance, Swami Vivekananda, a prominent Hindu monk and philosopher, has noted that Tulsidas's writings reflect a synthesis of Advaita and Vishishtadvaita. Similarly, scholars such as S.K. Ramachandra Rao and K.S. Murthy have also noted the influence of both schools on Tulsidas's writings.

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